Monthly Archives: September 2009

The Divinity of Do-Over’s

The Divinity of Do-Over’s

Recently, I crossed paths with a friend and we were talking about my recent blog post, The Reality of Perception.  As I was listening to her verbal commentary on the idea of creating your reality by taking responsibility for your perception, I heard myself say aloud “I know, it’s like we forget what we’ve already learned, like we fall asleep or something.”  And in that moment, a light bulb flickered on for me.  Our physical sleep/wake cycles are a metaphor for our spiritual sleep/wake cycles.  My frustrations with supposedly making no progress in certain areas of my life and the feeling of constant do-over’s was not some spiritual learning disability on my part, but rather it was the nature of the cycle of spiritual learning.

In the same way our physical bodies must have sleep, so that we can experience “wake”; and we must have “wake” so sleep has purpose; new realizations about our personal life lessons only have meaning in the context of having had a period of “sleep”.  I have to keep “coming back” [to life] to remember what I already know!  Everything is always revealed in its divine timing. Sometimes I have heard the same thing from many different messengers, before I finally “got it”.  It has nothing to do with the messenger whose message finally “sticks”.  They are just an instrument for the divine voice-mails I needed for that moment in time.  At that precise moment, I was capable of hearing and receiving my personal, divine messages, because everything that led up to that moment prepared me of being capable of recognizing something that rings as a personal truth for me.  Alas, a moment of clarity–a new realization, the finding of the puzzle piece for which I’ve been tirelessly searching!  And yet, as holds true to spiritual law, I will temporarily forget that moment of clarity until either that lessons cycles back around or I find myself in someone’s path that is in need of that morsel of clarity.  In sharing it with them, I am reinforcing my own spiritual learning.

Wow!  What grace!  And how about that for an answer to my frustration?!  Accept and embrace the nature of the process instead of participating in my own frustration by attempting to bend the natural course of a spiritual process to what I think I need.  The way I try to bend it is not really how I want it anyway.  I really like it better the way it is.  There is more grace in that.  It  is the way its supposed to be.  We are all exactly where we are supposed to be, doing exactly what we are supposed to be doing, even if we don’t like it or understand why.  We all get to experience life thru its lessons. Thank God for do-over’s!  Maybe now I can stop participating in retarding my own growth!

The Reality of Perception

The Reality of Perception

Have you ever heard someone say “People’s perception is their reality.”?  I have heard this practically all of my life, but in the last few weeks I have been thinking about it on a deeper level as I have wiggled my way thru a cocoon of change.  I am discovering that I choose my reality–my experience–by being vigilant over my perceptions.

For many years, I have wanted to see different results in several areas of my life.  Wanting or wishing for different results is not the same thing as actually being willing to do the work necessary to get the result.  Change is always an inside job and much of that change has to do with the neighborhood of our inner thoughts and perceptions.

If, for example, I am thinking about how hard a project is going to be, I am really sabotaging myself and setting myself up to see only the difficulties and frustrations.  If, however, I am thinking about how exciting a project is going to be and focused on all the gifts in store for me, then I am setting myself up to see only those things, which in turn minimizes the difficulties and frustrations, or at least my perception of them.  It’s not that the the gifts don’t exist in one scenario or that the difficulties don’t exist in the other; they both exist in the essence of the same project.  The only thing that changes are those things on which I choose to focus and it is precisely those things that determine what my judgement of the outcome will be–good or bad, enjoyable or miserable, fruitful or disasterous.  As an aside, praying for happy memories at family functions was some of the best advice I think I’ve ever received.  It truly makes all the difference in the world!

So I can choose to believe in the result I desire, direct all of my thinking toward that result and it is likely that eventually I will get that result.  Or I can let the fear of the undesired result dominate my thinking and eventually I will get that result.  I am discovering, though, that some desired results take longer than others, even when pumped with consistent focus.  It is not always a matter of thinking the thought and Presto!, that thought becomes a reality.  Sometimes that is the case, but not always. Sometimes, there are other iceberg beliefs that, in the process of focusing on my desired reality, will get untangled so that the focus of my thoughts can become a reality.  There is some stamina required here.  I have learned to keep focusing on the result anyway and surrender the ultimate timing of its arrival.  And I have also learned that, because it is not predictably always the case, I enjoy the element of surprise sometimes when the Universe does grant me the desires of my focus quickly.

I have always known that I have choices; we all do.  We all have the power to choose our realities.  But where I have fallen short is in being able to choose the desired results in the face of fear so potent that I can feel the feelings in my body as if the circumstances are presently happening.  At times like this, the possibility of being able to believe in something different, especially a more desirous result, seems virtually impossible, if not bleak.  However impossible it may seem though, it is critical to my getting out of the fear, even if it is a “start and start over” process.  To me, this is where faith enters the picture–believe even when it seems bleak.

I’ve discovered that I must be conscientious and vigilant over my thoughts at ALL times.  Doing so affords me insurance–a sort of mental insurance that when the fear of life’s circumstances shoves me on its merry-go-round, I can say “No, thank you”, get off and choose a different reality.  Those trips on the merry-go-round of ugly and scary thoughts that feel so good or even prudent at the moment are, in fact, an erosion to my mental insurance.  Without this insurance, I have very little reserves of stamina.

The reality of perception is that I choose the perceptions that become a reality in my life and the reality of my life is on the inside of me, not in the circumstances outside of me.

Movement of Consciousness

Movement of Consciousness

One of my friends, Rick Morgan, made this comment on my post about Depression:

Now, if you really want to go down the rabbit hole… Many leading quantum physicists agree that there are an infinite number of parallel universes that exist in very close proximity, and that our consciousness exists in the universe that matches our vibrational frequency. I believe that we shift through these universes at will by changing our own vibration/emotional state. So, when we I force myself to be happy and expect good things to happen for me and my family and friends, I’m actually shifting to a reality where those things exist. So, do you want the blue pill, or the red pill, Neo?

I thought the commentary was too good not to share and I suppose I feel like going down a rabbit hole this morning with deep thinking.  I have often pondered the probability of what he presents here and I am coming to the conclusion that, while it may defy logic, the experiences I’ve had support this theory to be true.

I frequently find myself vacillating between what feels like different worlds.  From all outward appearances, I am still present, but it’s like the inside of me has gone somewhere else.  “Lost in a daydream” does not quite describe the experience, although I do experience being momentarily lost in daydreams and I do think that is probably a “short trip” form of time travel.  What I thought was so striking about Rick’s comment was that it presents time travel as the movement of our consciousness, rather than our physical manifestations.  I think “time travel” as we define it here happens to us all the time as a very natural thing that occurs without our awareness.  I think we all experience it, we just label it as weird, freaky, unbelievable, unexplainable, coincidental, bizarre…anything but time travel!  Time travel seems to have acquired this taboo reserved exclusively for the mad scientist, not to mention the assumption that it must be our physical manifestations that travel, which of course, makes the whole deal very un-plausible, hence the madness!

Back in March 2006, a poem called “This World That” chased me down demanding to be written.  It was an explanation to my lover addressing his frustration with my attentiveness or lack of it.  It describes my vacillating between worlds and how he can tell it in my eyes. To go to the blog post, click here.  The movement of our consciousness between realities is not really paranormal, it is only perceived as paranormal because we put so much of our stock into only the things we can experience with our five senses.  What happened to the validity of our sixth sense?

Depression

Depression

What is “depression” anyhow?  Is it really real?  It most certainly feels real in the midst of it and yet our feelings are not our facts, or so I’m told.  And why is “depression” seemingly destined to plague writers, artists and scientists?  Is this a special designation that would otherwise be honorable if we didn’t, as a society, judge it different?  If society was built around the eccentricities of artistic and scientific madness, wouldn’t that then be the norm and we might perceive the rest of the world as walking zombies, maniacs engaging in pointless activity, autistic, obsessive-compulsive, lepers or a bunch of heathens???  And in that sense, the word “depress-ion” hardly seems apropos.  It seems “alive-sion” might be better suited.

Is “depression” only perceived as “depression” because of how it looks from the outside?  Would it still be called “depression” if you could see it from the inside?  And for the one who is “feeling” it from the inside, does it feel “depress”ing because it is a battleground between calling and purpose and desire vs. expectation, obligation and responsibility?  And then further compounded by the act of depressing the former in the interest of the latter?